Shea it Ain’t So

It’s been a long week. From sitting through hour long lectures, to getting up for my 8am, all while trying to catch some z’s in my welch dorm room in this unbearable heat. With so many things to do, there has one thing motivating me to keep going: the weekend, and with it, the first football game at Boston College. My memories of freshman year game days are filled with nothing but pure bliss. Cracking beers at 9am, throwing on an absolute fire game day outfit, and heading down to Shea field with some friends was how it usually began. Ah Shea field…what a beauty. She had everything: corn hole, countless grills, beer, brats, kids tossing the football, beautiful women, Boston college students as far as the eye could see …it was truly the epitome of what a college football tailgate should be. However I am afraid that Shea field may never be the same again.

This past Sunday my friends and I rolled down to lower for our first community meeting, eagerly awaiting Remy Ball’s presentation about how great life on Coro would be. The presentation was pretty standard: respect the buildings, no underage drinking in the dorms (lol), don’t break the red tabs, etc… Yet at the end of the presentation my girl Remy dropped an absolute bombshell on the whole Coro community—the policy change to Shea field. No longer will Shea field be open to the public. You will need an official wristband to enter Shea.

My first reaction was disappointment but I wasn’t totally crushed. I mean last year even after Shea was closed people would always find ways in. People would get extra wristbands, hop the far fence, pass wristbands back, and even order fake wristbands online. Beating the system was far too easy. However as I learned more about the situation, it became clear that beating the system would be difficult. In previous years, if you had a tailgating spot, you would receive between 20-30 wristbands to give to your friends.

This year a tailgating spots receive 8 wristbands so your chances of getting an extra are drastically lower. In addition, word on the street is they are going to be scanning wristbands for authenticity so no more ordering of fake wristbands. You could still hop the fence but even then chances are you or most of your friends get caught. It’s a desperation move that I advise not doing. Not only this but the price of tailgating spots on Shea increased by a large margin. My friends who are recent graduates could not afford another spot on Shea and I assume that many other young BC alum are in the same position. What do they expect us to do? Go to the super fan zone? (Has anyone actually ever been there?) Hell no.

So what does all this mean? From my calculations the number of people on Shea field will drastically drop. Not only this but the average age of Shea will go from around 21 to around 40. The main inhabitants being moms, dads, grandpas, and other old people. This combination no doubt means that Shea field will be less fun.

Less people + only old people= less fun     (Who made this decision by the way???)

Sure Shea field will still be a great place to get ready to cheer on the Eagles but I am willing to bet it will lose its feel of a college tailgate.

What do we do now? This is a question we should all be asking ourselves. The new regulations have taken something great away from us. But we are problem solvers, and we are resilient. Tailgating is football tradition, hundreds of years old that I refuse to let die here at BC. New tailgating spots could include Edmonds, Brighton, or even just off campus. I know the Eagles will rally and find a new go-to tailgating place.

I cannot wait to watch our boys trash Maine tomorrow, but I also can’t wait to see what the new tailgating scene is. Whatever happens try to do your best to have some fun. Freshmen, get out of your dorms and come down to lower. Hit up that kid from your high school and ask if you can come to his tailgate. Upperclassmen: be inviting and let’s start the season and year off right. And of course…go eagles baby.

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